Kimberly Queen Fern

About

The Kimberley Queen fern (Nephrolepis obliterata) was originally found growing as an outdoor plant in Australia. Today it is   a very popular indoor and outdoor plant throughout the world. There is something very elegant about a fern and now, with the cultivation of the Kimberley Queen fern , or Australian Sword Fern as it is commonly called, we can all have one growing in our homes or, in warm climates, outside. Unlike the Boston fern, Dallas fern, or Fluffy Ruffle fern, the Kimberley Queen fern is more compact, tidier, and is easier to care for.

Kimberly Queen Fern Description

Although a close relative of the Boston fern, both are members of the Nephrolepis family (Sword family), the Kimberly Queen fern has erect, narrow, and sword shaped fronds while the Boston fern has long, arching fronds. The Boston fern is a bit messy, often shedding small leaflets, while the Kimberly Queen fern rarely sheds leaves. Like all ferns, a Kimberley Queen fern does prefer and grows more quickly in high humidity but still does well in basic household humidity.

In warm, temperate climates, where the temperature stays above 60°F (15.5°C), the extremely adaptable Kimberley Queen fern can be grown outdoors in the shade or partial shade. When given enough space, these ferns can sometimes grow as large as 3ft high and 3ft wide. In cooler climates these plants need to be brought indoors for the winter.

As a houseplant, the Kimberley Queen fern grows much faster and needs less care than a Boston fern. The  green, sword shaped fronds can be an attractive mixture of those growing straight upward and those gracefully arching over.

Quick Care Tips

bright indirect lightVery few houseplants should be placed in direct sun. High light refers only to bright indirect light since direct sun often burns the leaves of indoor houseplants. An area that is too hot and dry encourages Spider Mites and causes blooms to quickly fade. A northern exposure really doesn't provide enough light for high light plants. These plants need to be placed directly in front of an east-facing window, within 1-3 feet of a west-facing window, and within 5 ft. of a south facing window. A high light area has over 300 ft. candles of light. from a north or east-facing window

Brown dots on back of fronds are not pests or signs of disease. They are spores and can be used for propagationLearn how to propagate plants by plant division at https://www.houseplant411.com/glossary

Repot on spring when roots have filled the existing pot

High humidity is a plus

Keep soil barely moist and never allow it to totally dry out

Best temperature is 60°F-70F° (15.5°C-21.1°C)

Conclusion

A Kimberly Queen Fern likes medium to bright indirect lightVery few houseplants should be placed in direct sun. High light refers only to bright indirect light since direct sun often burns the leaves of indoor houseplants. An area that is too hot and dry encourages Spider Mites and causes blooms to quickly fade. A northern exposure really doesn't provide enough light for high light plants. These plants need to be placed directly in front of an east-facing window, within 1-3 feet of a west-facing window, and within 5 ft. of a south facing window. A high light area has over 300 ft. candles of light. but too much bright lightVery few houseplants should be placed in direct sun. High light refers only to bright indirect light since direct sun often burns the leaves of indoor houseplants. An area that is too hot and dry encourages Spider Mites and causes blooms to quickly fade. A northern exposure really doesn't provide enough light for high light plants. These plants need to be placed directly in front of an east-facing window, within 1-3 feet of a west-facing window, and within 5 ft. of a south facing window. A high light area has over 300 ft. candles of light. fades the leaves. If you’re careful not to over water or over fertilize, a Kimberly Queen fern almost takes care of itself.  This durable plant grows well and looks beautiful hanging in a basket in front of a north facing window. Other added benefits of a Kimberly Queen fern are that it is an excellent “ clean air plantCertain houseplants clean the air of harmful chemicals.” eliminating harmful chemicals from the air. It is a not a poisonousPlants are a great addition to homes and offices, but it’s important to know whether your plants are dangerous to children, pets, or even adults. Some plants contain chemicals such as oxalates, solanine, glycosides, or alkaloid lycorine that may cause vomiting, nausea, diarrhea, swelling and redness of the mouth, throat, and lips, and trouble breathing. Touching parts of certain plants, especially the sap, may cause various skin irritations. The weight and age of the human or pet involved, and the part and amount of plant eaten determine how severe the reaction to the toxins will be. Although plants may be listed as non-toxic, they can still cause individual allergic reactions. If there is any question after a houseplant has been ingested or touched, immediately call the Poison Control Center 1-800-222-1222.  More poisonous houseplant information and pictures of common plants that are dangerous to children and pets can be found in my book Don’t Feed Me to Your Cat: A Guide to Poisonous Houseplants plant and is safe to have around children, dogs, cats, and other pets.

FAQ

The Tips of the Fronds on My Kimberly Queen Fern Are Turning Brown and Dying Before Growing to Their Full Length.

The fronds of a Kimberly Queen Fern need plenty of space to spread out. If they touch a window or table they will turn brown and stop growing. Excessive fertilizer and low humidity can also burn the tips.

Can I Hang My Fern in Front of a Southern Window?

A Kimberly Queen is one of the few ferns that can live in the direct sun. However, it will be happier and easier to care for if placed in medium indirect light.

I Have Boston Fern That Is Always Dropping Leaves and Making a Mess. Will a Kimberly Queen Fern Be Better?

Although a Kimberly queen fern does not have the long draping fronds of a Boston fern, it is quite superior in every other way. It is easy to grow and hard to kill unless you over- water. The large to almost upright fronds rarely drop leaves.

My Kimberly Queen Is Gettin Huge. Can I Cut It in Half and Plant Part of It Outside?

A Kimberly Queen does very well outside whether in a pot or planted in your garden if the temperature is fairly moderate. It will stop growing if the temperature drops below 55°F (12.8°C) and totally die if the temperature drops below freezing.