How to Propagate Dracaena Houseplants

Hi,
Would you be able to tell me what type of plant this is and how to propagate it? Thank you.

Hi Kevin,

Learn how to propagate a dracaena compacta with bare stems at askjudy@houseplant411.com

Your plant is called a Dracaena janet craig compacta. Janet craig cuttings will root in water, but the preferred method is to root them in a potting mix using cane cuttings. This propagation method is used when a plant has bare canes with just a few leaves at the top. Cut a 10”-12” piece of cane into 3”-4” sections. Each section should have one or two plant nodes. Dip the cut end of the cane into a small amount of Rooting Hormone that contains a Fungicide. Lay the sections horizontally in soil with the node facing up; alternatively, the cane section can be planted vertically with the node buried in the soil. The best rooting mix for your cutting is a  peat-based potting mix. (Janet Craigs are fluoride sensitive and perlite is a potent source of fluoride, so I don’t recommend using any soil containing perlite.) Use a small pot and keep the rooting mix evenly moist by watering it whenever the top half-inch feels dry. Cover the pot with clear plastic to increase the humidity and prevent the soil from drying out. You can read more about these dracaenas in the Popular Houseplant section of the website.

https://www.houseplant411.com/houseplant/how-to-grow-a-dracaena-compacta-plant-care-guide

Dracaena janet craig plants are considered by some to be slightly poisonousPlants are a great addition to homes and offices, but it’s important to know whether your plants are dangerous to children, pets, or even adults. Some plants contain chemicals such as oxalates, solanine, glycosides, or alkaloid lycorine that may cause vomiting, nausea, diarrhea, swelling and redness of the mouth, throat, and lips, and trouble breathing. Touching parts of certain plants, especially the sap, may cause various skin irritations. The weight and age of the human or pet involved, and the part and amount of plant eaten determine how severe the reaction to the toxins will be. Although plants may be listed as non-toxic, they can still cause individual allergic reactions. If there is any question after a houseplant has been ingested or touched, immediately call the Poison Control Center 1-800-222-1222.  More poisonous houseplant information and pictures of common plants that are dangerous to children and pets can be found in my book Don’t Feed Me to Your Cat: A Guide to Poisonous Houseplants, especially to dogs and cats. Read more about common houseplants that are poisonousPlants are a great addition to homes and offices, but it’s important to know whether your plants are dangerous to children, pets, or even adults. Some plants contain chemicals such as oxalates, solanine, glycosides, or alkaloid lycorine that may cause vomiting, nausea, diarrhea, swelling and redness of the mouth, throat, and lips, and trouble breathing. Touching parts of certain plants, especially the sap, may cause various skin irritations. The weight and age of the human or pet involved, and the part and amount of plant eaten determine how severe the reaction to the toxins will be. Although plants may be listed as non-toxic, they can still cause individual allergic reactions. If there is any question after a houseplant has been ingested or touched, immediately call the Poison Control Center 1-800-222-1222.  More poisonous houseplant information and pictures of common plants that are dangerous to children and pets can be found in my book Don’t Feed Me to Your Cat: A Guide to Poisonous Houseplants in Don’t Feed Me To Your Cat! A Guide to poisonous houseplantsIn her new book, Don’t Feed Me to Your Cat!, plant care professional Judy Feldstein shares information about twenty-five common houseplants, each with various levels of toxicity, and the possible consequences if your pet or child snacks on them..