Button Fern Turning Brown

I bought a Button Fern a few months back from Walmart. It has a self watering stick. Idk if I am over watering it or what. I’m hoping that you can help me. I named it Pendleton so I really hope that I can get it to come back.

Hi Sarah,

 If just leaf tips are turning brown the air is too dry or too warm. If entire branches are turning brown, the soil is staying too wet. Here are some care tips for a Button fern. (If you could email a close up of the leaves I could be more helpful.)
 

Water: Water well then allow the top few inches of soil to dry out before watering again. Fronds that are brown/yellow and wilted are a sign of overwatering.

Humidity: Moderate to high humidity. Use a humidifier if necessary

Temperature: Normal room temperatures 60-75°F/16-24°C

Soil: Loose fast draining soil

fertilizerPlants need fertilizer only when they are actively growing. Slow growing plants in low light require very little plant food. Too much fertilizer is worse than not enough. Most plants prefer a water soluble plant food at 1/2 the recommended strength. Plants that are in bloom or dormant should not be fertilized. Houseplant food contains nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K). A fertilizer containing these elements in equal proportion is considered a balanced plant food. Nitrogen helps in photosynthesis and encourages the growth of leaves and stems. Potassium and phosphorus also help in photosynthesis and aid in root and flower development. Most fertilizers have trace elements of other minerals that are lacking in the soil but are necessary for good plant growth. Fertilizers have a high salt content. If a plant is not producing new leaves and doesn’t absorb the fertilizer, salts build up in the soil. These salts can burn the roots, discolor the leaves, and cause new growth to be small.  : Feed monthly with a liquid fertilizerPlants need fertilizer only when they are actively growing. Slow growing plants in low light require very little plant food. Too much fertilizer is worse than not enough. Most plants prefer a water soluble plant food at 1/2 the recommended strength. Plants that are in bloom or dormant should not be fertilized. Houseplant food contains nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K). A fertilizer containing these elements in equal proportion is considered a balanced plant food. Nitrogen helps in photosynthesis and encourages the growth of leaves and stems. Potassium and phosphorus also help in photosynthesis and aid in root and flower development. Most fertilizers have trace elements of other minerals that are lacking in the soil but are necessary for good plant growth. Fertilizers have a high salt content. If a plant is not producing new leaves and doesn’t absorb the fertilizer, salts build up in the soil. These salts can burn the roots, discolor the leaves, and cause new growth to be small.   diluted to 1/2 the recommended strength when the plant is actively growing.