Wandering Jew Plant

Wandering Jew houseplants, are fast growing easy care plants that are perfect to hang in front of a window that gets bright indirect lightVery few houseplants should be placed in direct sun. High light refers only to bright indirect light since direct sun often burns the leaves of indoor houseplants. An area that is too hot and dry encourages Spider Mites and causes blooms to quickly fade. A northern exposure really doesn't provide enough light for high light plants. These plants need to be placed directly in front of an east-facing window, within 1-3 feet of a west-facing window, and within 5 ft. of a south facing window. A high light area has over 300 ft. candles of light.. The Zebrina variety of the Wandering Jew Plant has long vines covered in small stemless leaves about 2” in length. The colorful zebra patterned leaves of the Zebrina Wandering Jew Plant are green with purple stripes and a silver shine. The underside of the leaf of a Zebrina Wandering Jew Plant is a deep purple or magenta color. There are other types of Wandering Jew Plants that may have pink, off -white, or bronze stripe in their leaves. The Fluminensis variety of the Wandering Jew Plant has small solid green leaves and white flowers while the Palida variety of the Wandering Jew Plant has purple leaves with white, purple, or pink flowers. Wandering Jew Plants, native to South America and Mexico, are commonly used in the Tabasco region of Mexico as a cold herbal tea called Matali.

These plants are considered poisonous and should be kept away from pets and children. Read more about common houseplants that are poisonous in Don’t Feed Me To Your Cat! A Guide to Poisonous Houseplants

 

Amaryllis

Amaryllis plants are native to the tropical regions of South America. These spectacular easy care bulb plants can be planted from October through the end of April and will bloom from late December to June. With proper after-bloom care, an Amaryllis plant flowers year after year. Amaryllis Bulbs can be purchased pre-planted or you can do the planting yourself. The larger and fatter the plant bulbs, the more flowers an Amaryllis produces. The brightly colored flowers  come in red, orange, white, pink, and salmon. Some new varieties even have striped flowers.

Amaryllis plants are considered poisonous and should be kept away from pets and children. Learn more about common houseplants that are poisonous in Don’t Feed Me To Your Cat! A Guide to Poisonous Houseplants

 

 

 

Amaryllis Plant

Lipstick Plant

If you have a bright spot in you home or office and want a graceful draping plant that blooms off and on all year, lipstick plants are a great choice. Although a relative of the somewhat finicky African violet, lipstick plants are very easy care indoor flowering houseplants. When given the right amount of light and not too much water, lipstick plants produce numerous red or orange small tubular flowers throughout the year. Not only are the flowers colorful, the leaves can be light green, dark green, or green and maroon. Hang lipstick plants from the ceiling, place them in a wall sconce, or sit one on a table, you will love having them as one of your houseplants.

Kalanchoe Plant

Kalanchoes, native to Madagascar, are easy-care, flowering succulent plants that do extremely well indoors. A relative of the jade plant, kalanchoes are short, bushy, upright plants with thick, oval-shaped scalloped leaves. A kalanchoe’s long-lasting star-like blooms appear in clusters at the ends of sturdy stems. The vibrant colored flowers come in red, orange, yellow, lavender, white, and pink. Some new varieties even have bi-colored flowers. These are great indoor plants to perk up your home during the long winter months. The shorter the days, the more flowers kalanchoes produce. Best of all, the blooms on kalanchoe plants may last up to 8 weeks.

All varieties of kalanchoes contain cardiac glycosides and are toxic to animals.Read more about common houseplants that are poisonous in Don’t Feed Me To Your Cat! A Guide to Poisonous Houseplants

 

 

Kalanchoe

 

Dracaena Warnekii

Dracaena warnekii, like all dracaenas, are hardy, slow-growing plants that thrive on neglect. Sometimes referred to as a “striped dracaena”, the warnekii has long, pointed, narrow green and white striped leaves and can be used as a table plant, bushy floor plant, or tall cane plant for home and office. The “jumbo” variety has wider leaves and is a more compact plant. The “lemon lime” cultivar has yellow and green stripes. A dracaena warnekii is one of the few colorful indoor plants that can survive in low lightWhen you select “Low Light” a list of the most adaptive plants in our database appears. These plants can live in lighting conditions too low to support any other plants in our database, but will grow faster in medium and high light. Variegation (color) in the leaves is often lost in low light. A plant in low light needs less water and fertilizer than the same plant in better light. Place a low-light plant within 2-3 ft. of a window with a northern exposure, 3-5 ft. of a window with an eastern exposure, 4-10 ft. of a window with a western exposure, and 10-18ft. of a window with a southern exposure. A low light area has between 50-150 ft. candles of light. The best low light house plants are: Chinese Evergreen, Dracaena Janet Craig, Peace Lily, Heart leaf Philodendron. conditions. NASA recommends the dracaena warnekii one of the top ten plants for removing formaldehyde from the air.

Dracaena warneki plants are considered by some to be slightly poisonous, especially to dogs and cats. Read more about common houseplants that are poisonous in Don’t Feed Me To Your Cat! A Guide to Poisonous Houseplants

 

 

Donkey’s Tail Plant

A Donkey’s Tail plant (Sedum Morganianum), sometimes called Burro’s Tail plant, is an easy-care Succulent PlantLearn the definition of a succulent plant and why they are called a "fat plant." native to Mexico. This very attractive and unique looking plant has long hanging stems covered in thick heavy blue-green leaves that overlap like the hair on a donkey’s tail. A Donkey’s Tail plant is very fragile and the leaves easily fall off if the plant is disturbed. These plants do well in hanging baskets where stems have lots of room to cascade down & no one can bump into it. Under the right conditions, a Donkey’s Tail plant may produce star-shaped flowers in pink, red, or lavender during the spring and summer. Do not confuse a Donkey’s Tail plant with Creeping Spurge or Myrtle Spurge which is sometimes incorrectly referred to as Donkey’s Tail plant. Myrtle Spurge is a poisonousPlants are a great addition to homes and offices, but it’s important to know whether your plants are dangerous to children, pets, or even adults. Some plants contain chemicals such as oxalates, solanine, glycosides, or alkaloid lycorine that may cause vomiting, nausea, diarrhea, swelling and redness of the mouth, throat, and lips, and trouble breathing. Touching parts of certain plants, especially the sap, may cause various skin irritations. The weight and age of the human or pet involved, and the part and amount of plant eaten determine how severe the reaction to the toxins will be. Although plants may be listed as non-toxic, they can still cause individual allergic reactions. If there is any question after a houseplant has been ingested or touched immediately call the Poison Control Center 1-800-222-1222 The Handbook of Poisonous and Injurious Plants [Paperback]is an excellent reference to keep around if you have young children and pets. plant and care should be taken when handling it.

Philodendron Xanadu Plant

The philodendron “Xanadu”, sometimes referred to as philodendron “Winterbourn”, is a large compact easy to grow plant. Each shiny green leathery leaf has 15-20 distinct lobes. A Xanadu is often wider than it is tall, reaching a height of 2-4ft. and a width of 3-5ft in ideal conditions. The leaves of this beautiful, exotic looking foliage plant can be as large as 16″-18″ long and 7″-14″  wide. Unlike many philodendrons, the Xanadu is an upright plant not a climber or vine. The best part is, the older a Xanadu gets the better it looks.

These plants are considered poisonous and should be kept away from pets and children. Read more about common houseplants that are poisonous in Don’t Feed Me To Your Cat! A Guide to Poisonous Houseplants

 

Yucca Plant

The spineless yucca plant, a native of Guatemala and southeast Mexico, is an ideal easy care houseplant. Yucca plants can be a bush or a stalk plant.  The long, leathery, pointed leaves of a yucca plant are a foot or more in length and about an inch wide. Yucca Plants are very top heavy and should always be set into a heavy clay or ceramic pot to prevent them from toppling over. A yucca is a plant that complements a Southwestern look in your home or office.

Split Leaf Philodendron

The Split leaf philodendron, also called monstera deliciosa or  swiss cheese plant, is a large, popular, easy- care houseplant that is not really in the philodendron family. There is a great deal of confusion about what to call this plant; the various names have become inter-changeable over the years. Some other other names for this plant are: windowleaf plant, ceriman, and Mexican breadfruit plant. Whatever we call them, these plants are native to the jungles of Mexico, Panama, and India, have big glossy heart- shaped leaves that, as the plant matures, split from the leaf edge to the center vein. These slits in the leaves are called cuts. A split leaf philodendron  grows rapidly and often has leaves that are up to 3ft. long and 2ft. wide. If you want a big, tropical, low maintenance plant, this one is perfect. The leaves, stems, and roots of a split leaf philodendron contain oxalic acid. The only part of the plant that is not poisonousPlants are a great addition to homes and offices, but it’s important to know whether your plants are dangerous to children, pets, or even adults. Some plants contain chemicals such as oxalates, solanine, glycosides, or alkaloid lycorine that may cause vomiting, nausea, diarrhea, swelling and redness of the mouth, throat, and lips, and trouble breathing. Touching parts of certain plants, especially the sap, may cause various skin irritations. The weight and age of the human or pet involved, and the part and amount of plant eaten determine how severe the reaction to the toxins will be. Although plants may be listed as non-toxic, they can still cause individual allergic reactions. If there is any question after a houseplant has been ingested or touched immediately call the Poison Control Center 1-800-222-1222 The Handbook of Poisonous and Injurious Plants [Paperback]is an excellent reference to keep around if you have young children and pets. is the delicious fruit it produces in nature.

Read more about common houseplants that are poisonous in Don’t Feed Me To Your Cat! A Guide to Poisonous Houseplants

Spider Plant

The graceful, easy care, indoor spider plant, that can also grow outdoors in the shade during the summer, produces leaves directly from the center of the plant. When kept root-bound, a spider plant sends out numerous long stems with baby plants at the ends that can easily be used for propagation. Spider plants are available with green leaves, green leaves trimmed in white, or white leaves trimmed in green. All varieties are easy to care for and fun to have. A spider plant is inexpensive and a great choice for beginning plant lovers; an added plus, spider plants clean the air of harmful toxins. Read about other easy care houseplants, like this spider plant, in  Don’t Talk to Me, I’ll Grow Better -A Guide to Easy Care Plants