Over- Watered Swedish Ivy-Why Most House Plants Die!

Hi Judy

I am doing a great job of killing this plant. Can’t figure out what I am doing wrong because I don’t know what type of plant this is. Please help.
Thanks
Meghann

Hi Meghann,

Your plant looks like a variegated Swedish Ivy (sometimes called Creeping Charlie)  but if you could email a closeup of an entire leaf, I could be more certain. This is what a variegated Swedish Ivy plant looks like. What do you think?

Green and white Swedish Ivy

Variegated Swedish Ivy (picture from National Gardening Ass.)

You appear to be over-watering your plant (whatever it turns out to be) and killing the roots. Most plants, especially small ones like yours, should be in a pot only an inch or two larger than the root ball. There must be drip holes in the bottom of the pot so excess water can drain out and the plant pot should never sit in water. If the plant roots are constantly wet, they disintegrate and can no longer supply the plant with water and nutrients from the soil. Also excess water displaces the oxygen in the soil that a plant needs. You can read all my care tips for a Swedish Ivy inthe Popular Houseplant section of the website. The picture is of the solid green variety but the careis practically the same. The only difference is that yours requires a bit more bright indirect lightVery few houseplants should be placed in direct sun. High light refers only to bright indirect light since direct sun often burns the leaves of indoor houseplants. An area that is too hot and dry encourages Spider Mites and causes blooms to quickly fade. A northern exposure really doesn't provide enough light for high light plants. These plants need to be placed directly in front of an east-facing window, within 1-3 feet of a west-facing window, and within 5 ft. of a south facing window. A high light area has over 300 ft. candles of light. to maintain the variegation in the leaves.

https://www.houseplant411.com/houseplant/swedish-ivy-plectranthus-how-to-grow-care