My mystery houseplant: Peruvian Daffodil

Hello!
I hope you can help me by identifying this plant. My neighbor gave it to me several years ago, and she did not know what it was. Hopefully I can attach an image.

Thank you in advance for any tips regarding my mystery plant,

Rosin

Hi Rosin,

Large, white, intricate Peruvian Daffodil flower

Peruvian Daffodil
Hymenocallis festalis

Your plant is a bulb plant called Hymenocallis festalis (“beautiful membrane”). The common names for this plant are Spider Lily or Peruvian Daffodil. You certainly seem to know how to care for this beautiful fragrant houseplant. For those of you who might want to try growing these gorgeous bulb plants, here are some care tips:

Common Name: Peruvian Daffodil
Type: Bulb
Family: Amaryllidaceae
Flowers: Fragrant, resemble both daffodils and lilies
Bloom Time: Usually July to August
Bloom Description: White
Sun: Full sun
Water: Medium, the glossy green amaryllis-like foliage forms a large leaf clump that quickly grows when the plant is kept moist
Flower: Showy and Fragrant
poisonousPlants are a great addition to homes and offices, but it’s important to know whether your plants are dangerous to children, pets, or even adults. Some plants contain chemicals such as oxalates, solanine, glycosides, or alkaloid lycorine that may cause vomiting, nausea, diarrhea, swelling and redness of the mouth, throat, and lips, and trouble breathing. Touching parts of certain plants, especially the sap, may cause various skin irritations. The weight and age of the human or pet involved, and the part and amount of plant eaten determine how severe the reaction to the toxins will be. Although plants may be listed as non-toxic, they can still cause individual allergic reactions. If there is any question after a houseplant has been ingested or touched immediately call the Poison Control Center 1-800-222-1222 The Handbook of Poisonous and Injurious Plants [Paperback]is an excellent reference to keep around if you have young children and pets.: Bulb is poisonousPlants are a great addition to homes and offices, but it’s important to know whether your plants are dangerous to children, pets, or even adults. Some plants contain chemicals such as oxalates, solanine, glycosides, or alkaloid lycorine that may cause vomiting, nausea, diarrhea, swelling and redness of the mouth, throat, and lips, and trouble breathing. Touching parts of certain plants, especially the sap, may cause various skin irritations. The weight and age of the human or pet involved, and the part and amount of plant eaten determine how severe the reaction to the toxins will be. Although plants may be listed as non-toxic, they can still cause individual allergic reactions. If there is any question after a houseplant has been ingested or touched immediately call the Poison Control Center 1-800-222-1222 The Handbook of Poisonous and Injurious Plants [Paperback]is an excellent reference to keep around if you have young children and pets. if eaten