Croton Leaves Turning Brown

We received this plant when my father in law passed away 3 1/2 years ago. It has sat in the same place where it seemed to be ok.
I recently noticed the brown in the stem and on the leaves’ edges. Do you know why its there and what I can do to make it go away?
Thanks!

Hi Susie,

Brown edges on Croton plant leaves

Brown Leaves on Croton

Your plant is a type of Croton plant. If it has sat in the same place for several years, I think you need to change the soil. Over the years, chemicals from your household water like fluorine and chlorine and excess salts from plant food have probably accumulated in the soil and are causing “leaf burn.” Try replacing your old soil with fresh potting soil, that should hopefully solve the problem. You can read all mu care tips for a croton in the Popular Houseplant section of the website. The croton in the picture is much more colorful than yours because it has been in better light.

https://www.houseplant411.com/houseplant/croton-how-to-grow-care-for-croton-plant

These plants are considered poisonousPlants are a great addition to homes and offices, but it’s important to know whether your plants are dangerous to children, pets, or even adults. Some plants contain chemicals such as oxalates, solanine, glycosides, or alkaloid lycorine that may cause vomiting, nausea, diarrhea, swelling and redness of the mouth, throat, and lips, and trouble breathing. Touching parts of certain plants, especially the sap, may cause various skin irritations. The weight and age of the human or pet involved, and the part and amount of plant eaten determine how severe the reaction to the toxins will be. Although plants may be listed as non-toxic, they can still cause individual allergic reactions. If there is any question after a houseplant has been ingested or touched immediately call the Poison Control Center 1-800-222-1222 The Handbook of Poisonous and Injurious Plants [Paperback]is an excellent reference to keep around if you have young children and pets. and should be kept away from pets and children. Read more about common houseplants that are poisonousPlants are a great addition to homes and offices, but it’s important to know whether your plants are dangerous to children, pets, or even adults. Some plants contain chemicals such as oxalates, solanine, glycosides, or alkaloid lycorine that may cause vomiting, nausea, diarrhea, swelling and redness of the mouth, throat, and lips, and trouble breathing. Touching parts of certain plants, especially the sap, may cause various skin irritations. The weight and age of the human or pet involved, and the part and amount of plant eaten determine how severe the reaction to the toxins will be. Although plants may be listed as non-toxic, they can still cause individual allergic reactions. If there is any question after a houseplant has been ingested or touched immediately call the Poison Control Center 1-800-222-1222 The Handbook of Poisonous and Injurious Plants [Paperback]is an excellent reference to keep around if you have young children and pets. in Don’t Feed Me To Your Cat! A Guide to Poisonous Houseplants