Please Identify these Houseplant and their Problems

Hi, I live in Shanghai China and I went to the indoor houseplant and flower market, and purchased a number of plants About a month ago. Several of them are not doing well. It seems that they suffered a shock from moving from the market, which was very very humid, to our living room which is relatively dry. Some of them developed a root rot, and others are have some leaf problems. I know that they use a lot of fertilizerPlants need fertilizer only when they are actively growing. Slow growing plants in low light require very little plant food. Too much fertilizer is worse than not enough. Most plants prefer a water soluble plant food at 1/2 the recommended strength. Plants that are in bloom or dormant should not be fertilized. Houseplant food contains nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K). A fertilizer containing these elements in equal proportion is considered a balanced plant food. Nitrogen helps in photosynthesis and encourages the growth of leaves and stems. Potassium and phosphorus also help in photosynthesis and aid in root and flower development. Most fertilizers have trace elements of other minerals that are lacking in the soil but are necessary for good plant growth. Fertilizers have a high salt content. If a plant is not producing new leaves and doesn’t absorb the fertilizer, salts build up in the soil. These salts can burn the roots, discolor the leaves, and cause new growth to be small. in China, because it’s government-subsidized so it’s cheap, can that be a problem as well? Perhaps they dumped a bunch of fertilizerPlants need fertilizer only when they are actively growing. Slow growing plants in low light require very little plant food. Too much fertilizer is worse than not enough. Most plants prefer a water soluble plant food at 1/2 the recommended strength. Plants that are in bloom or dormant should not be fertilized. Houseplant food contains nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K). A fertilizer containing these elements in equal proportion is considered a balanced plant food. Nitrogen helps in photosynthesis and encourages the growth of leaves and stems. Potassium and phosphorus also help in photosynthesis and aid in root and flower development. Most fertilizers have trace elements of other minerals that are lacking in the soil but are necessary for good plant growth. Fertilizers have a high salt content. If a plant is not producing new leaves and doesn’t absorb the fertilizer, salts build up in the soil. These salts can burn the roots, discolor the leaves, and cause new growth to be small. in them before they deliverd the plants here.
I am attaching some photos- can you please help me identify the problem? The first photo is of a droopy plant.

thank you.

Hi Elizabeta,

You are right that too much fertilizerPlants need fertilizer only when they are actively growing. Slow growing plants in low light require very little plant food. Too much fertilizer is worse than not enough. Most plants prefer a water soluble plant food at 1/2 the recommended strength. Plants that are in bloom or dormant should not be fertilized. Houseplant food contains nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K). A fertilizer containing these elements in equal proportion is considered a balanced plant food. Nitrogen helps in photosynthesis and encourages the growth of leaves and stems. Potassium and phosphorus also help in photosynthesis and aid in root and flower development. Most fertilizers have trace elements of other minerals that are lacking in the soil but are necessary for good plant growth. Fertilizers have a high salt content. If a plant is not producing new leaves and doesn’t absorb the fertilizer, salts build up in the soil. These salts can burn the roots, discolor the leaves, and cause new growth to be small. is bad for houseplants. So you might want to flush the soil with distilled water if you can.

This first picture is a fern, probably a Boston Fern.

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It has been over watered. Ferns turn brown and crunchy in the center when they are over watered. The green color gets pale when they need water.

The second plant is a Palm, probably an Areca Palm.

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The tips of the fronds turn brown when the plant is over- watered, when it is over fertilized, or if there is salt, chlorine, or fluoride in the water. Allow the top 1-2″ of soil to dry out before watering and use distilled water if your water passes through a softener or has any chemicals in it.

The third plant is a Philodendron, probably a hastatum.

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It looks pretty good!

There are complete care instructions for all of these plants in the Popular HousePlant Section of the website.