Growing a Jade Plant Outside

Can I move My Jade Plant outdoors for the summer? What would be the pro’s and con’s of doing this? What should I do when I bring it in after the summer? I live in Edmonton Alberta Canada.


You can move your Jade plant outside for the summer, but do not put it in the direct sun or the leaves will burn. It will probably need water move often than when it was indoors. Keep a Jade Plant in an area that never goes below freezing or above 90 degrees. Cooler temperatures help a Jade Plant bloom. Before bring your Jade Plant indoors check for grasshoppers and other insects. Spray the plant with the green solutionIf you don't want to use a commercial chemical product to treat plant pest problems try the “Green Solution.” This is a mixture of water, alcohol, biodegradable liquid soap, and mineral oil. Always test any spray on one or two leaves to be sure it won’t damage the plant. Depending upon how severe the infestation is, you can use these ingredients in varying proportions. If there are only a few pests, dip a Q-tip in alcohol and gently swab them off. For a more widespread problem, start by using a spray of warm water mixed with a few tablespoons of biodegradable soap. If that doesn’t cure the problem, make a solution using 8oz. water & 8oz. alcohol, add two tablespoons of biodegradable soap and two tablespoons of mineral oil. Spray all areas of the plant. Use this solution on leathery leafed plants (except palms), never on fuzzy leafed plants like African Violets or Begonias. For palms, omit the alcohol from the Green Solution. Never spray a plant that’s sitting in the sun or one with very dry soil.     (read the recipe in the Glossary of the website) to get rid of any insects too small to easily see.

Thick green Jade Plant

Jade Plant

Bright pink and white Jade Plant flowers

Jade Plant in Bloom

High Resolution Front Cover.6092188

A Guide to Poisonous HouseplantsIn her new book, Don’t Feed Me to Your Cat!, plant care professional Judy Feldstein shares information about twenty-five common houseplants, each with various levels of toxicity, and the possible consequences if your pet or child snacks on them.