Are Holly Plants Poisonous?

Is it safe to decorate with branches from holly plants? I have 2 small children and 2 cats I am concerned about.

Hi Lois,

Red berries and green holly plant.

Holly Plant

The branches from a holly plant are fine to use for decorating as long as the red berries have been removed. The berries are very poisonousPlants are a great addition to homes and offices, but it’s important to know whether your plants are dangerous to children, pets, or even adults. Some plants contain chemicals such as oxalates, solanine, glycosides, or alkaloid lycorine that may cause vomiting, nausea, diarrhea, swelling and redness of the mouth, throat, and lips, and trouble breathing. Touching parts of certain plants, especially the sap, may cause various skin irritations. The weight and age of the human or pet involved, and the part and amount of plant eaten determine how severe the reaction to the toxins will be. Although plants may be listed as non-toxic, they can still cause individual allergic reactions. If there is any question after a houseplant has been ingested or touched immediately call the Poison Control Center 1-800-222-1222 The Handbook of Poisonous and Injurious Plants [Paperback]is an excellent reference to keep around if you have young children and pets. to people and animals and their bright color really attracts little children and pets. Be sure to  carefully remove ALL of the berries since swallowing even just a few berries can cause vomiting, diarrhea, dehydration, and drowsiness. Since the leaves are so prickly to the touch, kids and pets tend to avoid them.

If you think your child or pet has decided to snack on any poisonousPlants are a great addition to homes and offices, but it’s important to know whether your plants are dangerous to children, pets, or even adults. Some plants contain chemicals such as oxalates, solanine, glycosides, or alkaloid lycorine that may cause vomiting, nausea, diarrhea, swelling and redness of the mouth, throat, and lips, and trouble breathing. Touching parts of certain plants, especially the sap, may cause various skin irritations. The weight and age of the human or pet involved, and the part and amount of plant eaten determine how severe the reaction to the toxins will be. Although plants may be listed as non-toxic, they can still cause individual allergic reactions. If there is any question after a houseplant has been ingested or touched immediately call the Poison Control Center 1-800-222-1222 The Handbook of Poisonous and Injurious Plants [Paperback]is an excellent reference to keep around if you have young children and pets. plant, not just a holly plant, quickly take any pieces you can see or feel out of his or her mouth. If who- ever ate the plant is choking or not breathing well, immediately call 911. Otherwise, call the Poison Control Center at the number below.

American Association of Poison Control Centers

1-800-222-1222

This is a free service and can be reached from anywhere in the United States. Call with questions about poisoning or poison prevention twenty- four hours a day, seven days a week. It does not have to be an emergency.

IMPORTANT: Stay calm and have the following information ready:

Your child’s or pet’s age, weight, and symptoms
If you know it, the name of the plant, the part that was eaten, and the amount.
How long since the plant ended up where it didn’t belong.

Don’t try to get your child to throw up unless the poison control center or a healthcare professional suggests it. If you go to an emergency room or doctor’s office, take as much of the plant as possible; don’t forget bulbs, berries, and flowers. The faster you get help, the better the chances of a full and quick recovery and a happy ending.

You can learn more about Poisonous HouseplantsIn her new book, Don’t Feed Me to Your Cat!, plant care professional Judy Feldstein shares information about twenty-five common houseplants, each with various levels of toxicity, and the possible consequences if your pet or child snacks on them. that should be kept far away from children and pets in my book Don”t Feed Me to Your Cat: A Guide to Poisonous HouseplantsIn her new book, Don’t Feed Me to Your Cat!, plant care professional Judy Feldstein shares information about twenty-five common houseplants, each with various levels of toxicity, and the possible consequences if your pet or child snacks on them. available on Amazon.

http://amzn.to/2ffaXMS

516vfyeqkul