Schefflera Plant has Scale!

Hi Lees,

The brown “stuff”on the midrib is a plant pest called Scale. Soft Brown Scale is the most common scale that attacks indoor houseplants especially ficus, ivy, spider plants, ferns, aralias, and scheffleras. It appears as small bumpy brown spots.  As the scale sucks on the sap of the plant it usually secretes a sticky substance called honeydew. The honeydew may attract black mildew. Because of the shell-like exterior of the scale, sprays are only partially effective. Wipe off the lines of brown oval bumps with your finger, a cloth, or a child’s toothbrush then spray the plant with Neem Oil. Check the front and backs of all the leaves on your plant and also check the stems of the plant; you need to get rid of all the scale before the plant dies.

These plants are considered poisonous and should be kept away from pets and children. Read more about common houseplants that are poisonous in Don’t Feed Me To Your Cat! A Guide to Poisonous Houseplants


 

 

Plants Need to Be Identified Please!

Hi Sunada,

This is a Peace Lily (Spathiphyllum). The leaves are turning black/brown because you are over watering!!! You can find all my care tips for a Peace Lily in the Popular Houseplant section of the website.

https://www.houseplant411.com/houseplant/peace-lily-spathiphyllum-how-to-grow-care-for-peace-lily

This is a Bromeliad that has finished blooming. These plants rarely bloom again indoors and most people throw the plant out once the blooms have died. You can read all about Bromeliads in the Popular Houseplant section of the website.

https://www.houseplant411.com/houseplant/bromeliads-how-to-grow-care-tips

This looks like a type of Pothos plant, probably a Marble Queen variety. If you could email a close up of an entire leaf I could be more certain. Here’s what a Marble Queen Pothos looks like, what do you think? You can read about this plant also in the Popular Houseplant section of the website.

https://www.houseplant411.com/houseplant/marble-queen-pothos-how-to-grow-care

The Peace Lily and the Marble Queen Pothos are considered poisonous and should be kept away from pets and children. Read more about common houseplants that are poisonous in Don’t Feed Me To Your Cat! A Guide to Poisonous Houseplants

 

 

 

 

How do I care for my Christmas Cactus after the flowers Die??

Hi Molly,

Dark pink flowers on Christmas Cactus plant

Christmas Cactus in Bloom

Here are some simple care tips for your Christmas Cactus now the it’s finished flowering.

Pruning a Christmas Cactus helps it become a full bushy plant and produce more flowers next holiday season. The best time to prune a Christmas Cactus is about 4-6 weeks after it has finished blooming. During the first 30 days or so keep the soil drier than usual. You should never prune a Christmas Cactus after the month of May. A Christmas Cactus is easily propagated in the spring using these stem tip cuttings. Use at least three jointed segments from a healthy stem in each small pot. Allow the stem cuttings to dry out for a few hours before planting them to avoid stem rot.

Don’t rush to move your Christmas Cactus to a larger pot. Christmas Cactus plants grow better and bloom more when they are slightly root-bound in smaller pots. When your Christmas Cactus needs to be re-potted, usually only every few years, wait until it has finished flowering in the spring. Never re-pot a Christmas Cactus when it is in bloom.

Christmas Cactus are wonderful plants; they often live for 50 years or more!

Plant Identification Help

Hi Katie,

Thick green leaves with purple under sides of peperomia capperato "rosso"

Peperomia caperata Rosso

Your plant is called a Peperomia caperata ‘Rosso.’ There are over 1000 varieties of Peperomia plants. All Peperomia plants, which belong to the pepper family, are semi- succulents with very similar care requirements. Over watering is the main reason peperomia plants die. Place a peperomia in very bright indirect light and watch it thrive on neglect! You can read all my care tips for a peperomia in the Popular Houseplant section of the website. The picture is of a different variety, but the care is the same.

https://www.houseplant411.com/houseplant/peperomia-caperata-how-to-grow-care-tips

These plants are considered poisonousPlants are a great addition to homes and offices, but it’s important to know whether your plants are dangerous to children, pets, or even adults. Some plants contain chemicals such as oxalates, solanine, glycosides, or alkaloid lycorine that may cause vomiting, nausea, diarrhea, swelling and redness of the mouth, throat, and lips, and trouble breathing. Touching parts of certain plants, especially the sap, may cause various skin irritations. The weight and age of the human or pet involved, and the part and amount of plant eaten determine how severe the reaction to the toxins will be. Although plants may be listed as non-toxic, they can still cause individual allergic reactions. If there is any question after a houseplant has been ingested or touched immediately call the Poison Control Center 1-800-222-1222 The Handbook of Poisonous and Injurious Plants [Paperback]is an excellent reference to keep around if you have young children and pets. and should be kept away from pets and children. Read more about common houseplants that are poisonousPlants are a great addition to homes and offices, but it’s important to know whether your plants are dangerous to children, pets, or even adults. Some plants contain chemicals such as oxalates, solanine, glycosides, or alkaloid lycorine that may cause vomiting, nausea, diarrhea, swelling and redness of the mouth, throat, and lips, and trouble breathing. Touching parts of certain plants, especially the sap, may cause various skin irritations. The weight and age of the human or pet involved, and the part and amount of plant eaten determine how severe the reaction to the toxins will be. Although plants may be listed as non-toxic, they can still cause individual allergic reactions. If there is any question after a houseplant has been ingested or touched immediately call the Poison Control Center 1-800-222-1222 The Handbook of Poisonous and Injurious Plants [Paperback]is an excellent reference to keep around if you have young children and pets. in Don’t Feed Me To Your Cat! A Guide to Poisonous Houseplants



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How to Care for a String of Pearls Plant

Hi Isabelle,

Your plant is a String of Pearls (Senecio rowleyanus). Trim the long stems to prevent the plant from becoming straggly. You can plant the stem tip cuttings back into the pot to help the plant look bushier. From the picture it looks like you’ve probably been over watering. Here are some care tips to help you grow a String of Pearls.

Water: This is a succulent plantLearn how to grow and care for succulent plants at Houseplant411.com that stores water in its plump leaves so be careful not to over water. I find that if I allow the green bead like leaves to get a little flat and then water well, the plant is quite happy. During the winter, when the plant is resting, water even less.

Light: very bright lightVery few houseplants should be placed in direct sun. High light refers only to bright indirect light since direct sun often burns the leaves of indoor houseplants. An area that is too hot and dry encourages Spider Mites and causes blooms to quickly fade. A northern exposure really doesn't provide enough light for high light plants. These plants need to be placed directly in front of an east-facing window, within 1-3 feet of a west-facing window, and within 5 ft. of a south facing window. A high light area has over 300 ft. candles of light. and even some morning direct sun.

Plant Food: Fertilize monthly from about April to October with a balanced liquid plant food diluted to 1/2 the recommended strength.

Temperature: A String of Pearls likes warm temperatures between 70-80°F.

Soil: Use a succulentLearn how to grow and care for succulent plants at Houseplant411.com or cactus potting mix that drains quickly.

Flowering:  String of Pearls produces tiny, white, fuzzy scented flowers.

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Please help me identify this little Plant

Hi Jeremy,

Your plant is a Hypoestes Splash “White” also called a Polka Dot Plant. You can find all my care tips for this plant in the Popular Houseplant section of the website. The picture is of the pink variety, but the care is the same. This plant needs to be kept trimmed back and small or it will get quite leggy. A Polka Dot plant looks beautiful in dish gardens or in small decorative containers.

https://www.houseplant411.com/houseplant/polka-dot-plant-how-to-grow

 

 

Dracaena Leaves Turning Brown

Hi Ashley,

Your plant looks like a Dracaena Corn Plant (Massengeana).

Leaf tip burn on a Dracaena is usually caused by too much chlorine, fluoride, or salt in the water; or too much plant food. Never use water that has passed through a softener on houseplants. It is much too salty. If your household water has a lot of fluoride or chlorine, let it sit out over night before using it or use distilled water. Feed a dracaena monthly, only in the spring and summer. Always dilute your plant food to 1/2 the recommended strength. If you give the plant too much plant food, it stays in the soil and burns the roots.

Brown tips on all types of houseplants are usually caused by these same things.



 

Identify Plants! Judy, Please Help!

Hi Garrett,

The plant with the little flowers is a Kalanchoe. The plant in the mug is a dracaena compacta. Be careful not to over water the dracaena since there are no drip holes in the bottom of the mug so excess water can drain out.

This is a variegated Peperomia plant. It likes bright lightVery few houseplants should be placed in direct sun. High light refers only to bright indirect light since direct sun often burns the leaves of indoor houseplants. An area that is too hot and dry encourages Spider Mites and causes blooms to quickly fade. A northern exposure really doesn't provide enough light for high light plants. These plants need to be placed directly in front of an east-facing window, within 1-3 feet of a west-facing window, and within 5 ft. of a south facing window. A high light area has over 300 ft. candles of light. and soil that is on the dry side.

You can read all my care advice on how to grow these plants in the Popular Houseplant section of the website.

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Help identify my Plant

Hi Yvonne,

Green striped leaves on Chinese Evergreen plant

Chinese Evergreen Plant
Aglaonema

It’s not a dieffenbachia it’s a striped Chinese Evergreen Plant. All of the many Chinese Evergreen plant varieties have long shiny leathery leaves with unique patterns of green, gray, and cream. NASA lists the Chinese Evergreen Plant as one of its top ten plants to clean the air of harmful toxins.

These plants are considered poisonous and should be kept away from pets and children. Read more about common houseplants that are poisonous in Don’t Feed Me To Your Cat! A Guide to Poisonous Houseplants

You can read all my care tips for this a Chinese Evergreen (Aglaonema) in the Popular Houseplant section of the website.

https://www.houseplant411.com/houseplant/chinese-evergreen-plant-amelia-how-to-grow

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Wandering Jew Plant: How to Propagate

Hi Terry,

 
Wandering Jew plants are propagated using stem cuttings. Be sure to remove all leaves within two inches of the bottom of the 4”- 6” cutting. Try to locate a node on the stem and cut right below it. A node is a small bump on the stem where a new leaf will grow. During propagationRead how to propagate houseplants by Plant Division at HousePlant411.com, this is where the new roots develop. Sometimes you can’t locate the node, so just be sure you are taking the cutting from a mature, healthy stem.
 
Wandering jew plants are easily propagated in water. Remember to remove any leaves at the bottom of the stem that might get into the water. I like to use a clear glass jar so I can watch the roots develop; once the roots are a few inches long it’s time to plant the cuttings in soil. It usually takes about 2-5 weeks for roots to appear. Keep the water  levelThese are general guidelines that describe how poisonous certain houseplants are. It's possible for an allergic reaction to occur from contact with any houseplant, toxic or non-toxic. If there is ever a concern, call: Poison Control Center: ******1-800-222-1222****** Level #1: Houseplants with low toxicity, may be mildly irritating, especially the sap of the plant. Level#2: Houseplants with medium to severe toxicity. Eating parts of these houseplants may result in vomiting, diarrhea, stomach pains, skin irritations, and breathing difficulties. Level #3: These houseplants are  very poisonous. When eaten, especially in large quantities,  severe vomiting, diarrhea, stomach pains, skin irritations, and breathing difficulties can occur. Level #4: These houseplants are extremely poisonous. Eating parts of these houseplants can be be life threatening. Every plant listed in our Popular HousePlant guide has a section explaining whether or not it is poisonous and, if so, how poisonous. Amaryllis, alocasia, dieffenbachias, crotons, ivies, azaleas, lilies, and philodendrons are just a few of the highly poisonous plants we use in our homes and offices all of the time. If you don't know whether your houseplant is poisonous, go to Ask Judy on the HousePlant411.com website, send her a picture of your plant, and she'll let you know if the houseplant should be kept away from small children and pets. See colorful pictures and get more information about poisonous houseplants in Don’t Feed Me To Your Cat! A Guide to Poisonous Houseplants   steady, refilling the water when necessary. Using several rooted stem clippings per pot helps the new plant become bushy and full. 
 
I find that rooting the plants in water is usually more successful and certainly easier than planting the clippings directly into soil. If you do want to plant directly in soil, use a 3 or 4 inch pot with drip holes in the bottom. Again, use 4”-6” clippings that have had their bottom leaves removed. Dip the cut ends in a very small amount of Rooting HormoneRooting Hormone helps plant cuttings produce new roots and is very important to use if you want your propagation attempts to be successful. Always dip the cut end of a stem or leaf into water and then dip it into the rooting hormone before planting it. Tap off any excess powder since too much hormone is worse than too little.. Once planted and watered, place the container in a clear plastic bag and seal the top. This create a mini greenhouse effect. You won’t have to water and new growth should develop in about 4 weeks. Once you see the new growth, you can remove the plastic bag and place your new plant bright indirect lightVery few houseplants should be placed in direct sun. High light refers only to bright indirect light since direct sun often burns the leaves of indoor houseplants. An area that is too hot and dry encourages Spider Mites and causes blooms to quickly fade. A northern exposure really doesn't provide enough light for high light plants. These plants need to be placed directly in front of an east-facing window, within 1-3 feet of a west-facing window, and within 5 ft. of a south facing window. A high light area has over 300 ft. candles of light..
These plants are considered poisonous and should be kept away from pets and children. Read more about common houseplants that are poisonous in Don’t Feed Me To Your Cat! A Guide to Poisonous Houseplants