Need help identifying rescue plant

Hi Andrea,

Your plant is a hoya plant. They are often referred to as Wax Plants because of the waxy nature of their leaves and flowers. Under the proper conditions all Hoya Plants produce five-pointed, star shaped, fragrant flowers that come in red, white, pink, purple, yellow, orange, and even black. Hoya Plants are perfect to hang in front of a bright sunny window

Hoya Plants do best and bloom more often in very bright light. They are one of the few indoor houseplants that can even thrive in direct sun. Although Hoya Plants can adapt to lower light, they grow slower and do not produce the fragrant waxy flowers that are so beautiful.

Hoya Plants are Succulent Plants. The soil of a Hoya Plant should dry out before being watered. These plants do thrive on neglect, but need additional water when in bloom.

Feed a Hoya Plant monthly with a balanced houseplant food at 1/2 the recommended strength when it is actively growing.

Hoya Plants can adapt to almost any moderate temperature, but prefer 60-65 degrees at night and 70-80 degrees during the day.

New flowers develop on the older stems of a Hoya Plant so never cut off the old flower stems.

You can read more about hoya plants in the Popular Houseplant section of the website.

https://www.houseplant411.com/houseplant/hoya-plant-how-to-grow-care-tips






 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please Identify Mysterious Plant

Hi,

Your plant looks like a Bird’s Nest Snake Plant, which is a type of Sansevieria trifasciata. You can read all of my care tips for Snake Plants in the Popular Houseplant section of the website. The picture is of a totally different variety but the care is the same.

https://www.houseplant411.com/houseplant/sansevieria-snake-plant-how-to-grow

These plants are considered poisonous and should be kept away from pets and children. Read more about common houseplants that are poisonous in Don’t Feed Me To Your Cat! A Guide to Poisonous Houseplants







What is My Plant and How do I Re-Pot It?

Hi Angie,

Your plant is a Neanthebella Palm (Lady Palm). If it needs more soil,  add any good fast- draining, loose, potting mix to the top of the container and pat it down. Keep the soil levelThese are general guidelines that describe how poisonous certain houseplants are. It's possible for an allergic reaction to occur from contact with any houseplant, toxic or non-toxic. If there is ever a concern, call: Poison Control Center: ******1-800-222-1222****** Level #1: Houseplants with low toxicity, may be mildly irritating, especially the sap of the plant. Level#2: Houseplants with medium to severe toxicity. Eating parts of these houseplants may result in vomiting, diarrhea, stomach pains, skin irritations, and breathing difficulties. Level #3: These houseplants are  very poisonous. When eaten, especially in large quantities,  severe vomiting, diarrhea, stomach pains, skin irritations, and breathing difficulties can occur. Level #4: These houseplants are extremely poisonous. Eating parts of these houseplants can be be life threatening. Every plant listed in our Popular HousePlant guide has a section explaining whether or not it is poisonous and, if so, how poisonous. Amaryllis, alocasia, dieffenbachias, crotons, ivies, azaleas, lilies, and philodendrons are just a few of the highly poisonous plants we use in our homes and offices all of the time. If you don't know whether your houseplant is poisonous, go to Ask Judy on the HousePlant411.com website, send her a picture of your plant, and she'll let you know if the houseplant should be kept away from small children and pets. See colorful pictures and get more information about poisonous houseplants in Don’t Feed Me To Your Cat! A Guide to Poisonous Houseplants   about an inch or two below the rim of the pot. If the roots of the plant are popping out of the top of the soil surface then you’ll need to do a little more work. Remove the plant from its pot. Empty out all of the soil. Place about 2″-3″ of fresh soil in the bottom of the pot, set the palm on top, and fill in with more good potting soil, tapping it down as you go along to prevent air pockets.  You can read all of my plant care tips for a Parlor Palm in the Popular Houseplant section of the website.

https://www.houseplant411.com/houseplant/parlor-palm-neanthebella-how-to-grow-care






 

 

 

Which type of plant, and how to care for it?

Hi Rory,

Green and cream colored variegated Rubber tree Plant

Variegated Rubber Tree Plant

Your plant is a variegated Rubber Tree plant. Here are some care tips to help you care for it:

Rubber Tree houseplants do best in medium to bright indirect light. The solid green and dark burgundy varieties of the Rubber Tree Plant can adapt to less light, but the stems may be weak and the leaves small. The variegated varieties need bright light to keep their creamy colors.

Rubber Tree houseplants are a little difficult to water. Always allow the top 25-30% of the soil  to dry out before watering. Keep the soil even drier when your plant is in lower light or the room temperature is cooler. The leaves of Rubber Trees turn yellow from under-water and over-water. Perfectly fine green, burgundy, or variegated leaves may fall off from over- water.

Rubber Tree houseplants do not need much fertilizer. Feed a Rubber tree plant every other month when it is actively growing.

Rubber Tree houseplants do well in warm temperatures between 70-80 degrees with a night time temperature around 65 degrees. Keep a Rubber Tree Plant away from cold drafts, air conditioners, heaters, and fireplaces.

You can read all of my care tips for a Rubber Tree in the Popular Houseplant section of the website.

https://www.houseplant411.com/houseplant/rubber-tree-how-to-grow-care

These plants are considered poisonousPlants are a great addition to homes and offices, but it’s important to know whether your plants are dangerous to children, pets, or even adults. Some plants contain chemicals such as oxalates, solanine, glycosides, or alkaloid lycorine that may cause vomiting, nausea, diarrhea, swelling and redness of the mouth, throat, and lips, and trouble breathing. Touching parts of certain plants, especially the sap, may cause various skin irritations. The weight and age of the human or pet involved, and the part and amount of plant eaten determine how severe the reaction to the toxins will be. Although plants may be listed as non-toxic, they can still cause individual allergic reactions. If there is any question after a houseplant has been ingested or touched immediately call the Poison Control Center 1-800-222-1222 The Handbook of Poisonous and Injurious Plants [Paperback]is an excellent reference to keep around if you have young children and pets. and should be kept away from pets and children. Read more about common houseplants that are poisonousPlants are a great addition to homes and offices, but it’s important to know whether your plants are dangerous to children, pets, or even adults. Some plants contain chemicals such as oxalates, solanine, glycosides, or alkaloid lycorine that may cause vomiting, nausea, diarrhea, swelling and redness of the mouth, throat, and lips, and trouble breathing. Touching parts of certain plants, especially the sap, may cause various skin irritations. The weight and age of the human or pet involved, and the part and amount of plant eaten determine how severe the reaction to the toxins will be. Although plants may be listed as non-toxic, they can still cause individual allergic reactions. If there is any question after a houseplant has been ingested or touched immediately call the Poison Control Center 1-800-222-1222 The Handbook of Poisonous and Injurious Plants [Paperback]is an excellent reference to keep around if you have young children and pets. in Don’t Feed Me To Your Cat! A Guide to Poisonous Houseplants




 

 

How to Prune a Dieffenbachia – Dumb Cane Plant

Hi Jerry,

Whoever told you that you can cut your dieffenbachia in half is just about right! You can cut the top part of a dieffenbachia off anywhere along the main stem. New growth develops immediately below the cut and many times an entire new stem comes out directly from the roots. Although you can plant the entire section you cut off, I’ve found that cutting it into 10″-12″ sections and removing some of the bottom leaves works a lot better and the propagationRead how to propagate houseplants by Plant Division at HousePlant411.com is more successful. Dip the end you’re placing in the soil in a small amount of Rooting HormoneRooting Hormone helps plant cuttings produce new roots and is very important to use if you want your propagation attempts to be successful. Always dip the cut end of a stem or leaf into water and then dip it into the rooting hormone before planting it. Tap off any excess powder since too much hormone is worse than too little. that contains a FungicideFungicides are chemical compounds that are used to kill or inhibit fungi or fungal spores. Fungi can cause serious damage to your houseplants. to help prevent root rot. You can plant the new starts back into the original pot or plant 2 or 3 into a 6″pot with drip holes in the bottom.

The sap from these plants is very poisonous and the plant should be kept away from pets and children. Always wear gloves when pruning the plant and never touch your mouth or eyes when working on the plant. Wash your tools well when finished. Read more about common houseplants that are poisonous in Don’t Feed Me To Your Cat! A Guide to Poisonous Houseplants









 

Need help identifying a rescue plant

Hi Lisa,

Your plant looks like a Crown of Thorns (Euphorbia milii)

Red flowers on Crown of Thorns

Crown of Thorns Plant

Here are some care tips:

A Crown of Thorns Plant is a poisonous houseplant with a level #2 toxicity. Broken or damaged leaves and stems ooze a milky latex substance that may cause blistering and pain if you have any open cuts. If a child or pet eats part of the plant, severe mouth irritation, gastro- intestinal problems, and even hemorrhage can occur. Read more about common houseplants that are poisonous in Don’t Feed Me To Your Cat! A Guide to Poisonous Houseplants








How to Care for an EPIPHYLLUM ORCHID CACTUS

Hi,

Red Orchid Cactus

Orchid Cactus

Taking care of these beautiful plants is a bit of a balancing act. They don’t like to be wet especially in the winter, but they also shouldn’t totally dry out.

An Orchid Cactus needs to go dormant for about 8-10 weeks during the winter months if you hope to have it bloom the next year. So during the winter, lower the temperature to around 45-50 degrees (if possible), water sparingly, and do not fertilize. Total darkness at night is a plus. In the spring, move an Orchid Cactus into bright indirect lightVery few houseplants should be placed in direct sun. High light refers only to bright indirect light since direct sun often burns the leaves of indoor houseplants. An area that is too hot and dry encourages Spider Mites and causes blooms to quickly fade. A northern exposure really doesn't provide enough light for high light plants. These plants need to be placed directly in front of an east-facing window, within 1-3 feet of a west-facing window, and within 5 ft. of a south facing window. A high light area has over 300 ft. candles of light. and feed with a plant food high in potassium. You should try to re-pot your plant every other year or so (in the Spring and never when it’s blooming), using  a pot just an inch or two larger. These plants bloom more when a little root-bound. Once the buds appear, do not move the plant, if you do your orchid cactus may drop buds and flowers; and keep it away from drafts and heating vents.

As far as the browning on the stems, first make sure the plant isn’t drying out too much or is too wet. When the top 50% of the soil has totally dried out, water well until the water comes out the bottom drip holes in the pot. Second, be sure your Orchid Cactus isn’t near a heating vent. The hot air can damage the stems. If your plant is browning and brittle much more on one side than another and is near a window, be sure there is no cold draft blowing on it.

Keep your pets and kids safe. See pictures and learn to identify houseplants that may be poisonousPlants are a great addition to homes and offices, but it’s important to know whether your plants are dangerous to children, pets, or even adults. Some plants contain chemicals such as oxalates, solanine, glycosides, or alkaloid lycorine that may cause vomiting, nausea, diarrhea, swelling and redness of the mouth, throat, and lips, and trouble breathing. Touching parts of certain plants, especially the sap, may cause various skin irritations. The weight and age of the human or pet involved, and the part and amount of plant eaten determine how severe the reaction to the toxins will be. Although plants may be listed as non-toxic, they can still cause individual allergic reactions. If there is any question after a houseplant has been ingested or touched immediately call the Poison Control Center 1-800-222-1222 The Handbook of Poisonous and Injurious Plants [Paperback]is an excellent reference to keep around if you have young children and pets. in Don’t Feed Me to Your Cat:A Guide to Poisonous HouseplantsIn her new book, Don’t Feed Me to Your Cat!, plant care professional Judy Feldstein shares information about twenty-five common houseplants, each with various levels of toxicity, and the possible consequences if your pet or child snacks on them. now available in paperback and kindle format

http://amzn.to/2irUvMz






 

 

 

 

Sago Palm Turning Yellow

Hi Marcia,

Rugged trunk, stiff green fronds on Sago Palm

Sago Palm

Yellow leaves on a Sago Palm, especially during the winter, is usually due to a watering problem. Sago Palms prefer to be on the dry side. When the plant was outside for the summer, it needed much more water than when it is inside for the winter, not growing as quickly, and the light is not as good.

Old fronds turn yellow from too much plant food. Sago Palms should not be fertilized in the winter.

New fronds start to turn yellow when the soil is lacking in certain nutrients such as nitrogen, magnesium, or potassium. Using a plant food especially for palms will solve this problem.

These plants are considered poisonousPlants are a great addition to homes and offices, but it’s important to know whether your plants are dangerous to children, pets, or even adults. Some plants contain chemicals such as oxalates, solanine, glycosides, or alkaloid lycorine that may cause vomiting, nausea, diarrhea, swelling and redness of the mouth, throat, and lips, and trouble breathing. Touching parts of certain plants, especially the sap, may cause various skin irritations. The weight and age of the human or pet involved, and the part and amount of plant eaten determine how severe the reaction to the toxins will be. Although plants may be listed as non-toxic, they can still cause individual allergic reactions. If there is any question after a houseplant has been ingested or touched immediately call the Poison Control Center 1-800-222-1222 The Handbook of Poisonous and Injurious Plants [Paperback]is an excellent reference to keep around if you have young children and pets. and should be kept away from pets and children. Read more about common houseplants that are poisonousPlants are a great addition to homes and offices, but it’s important to know whether your plants are dangerous to children, pets, or even adults. Some plants contain chemicals such as oxalates, solanine, glycosides, or alkaloid lycorine that may cause vomiting, nausea, diarrhea, swelling and redness of the mouth, throat, and lips, and trouble breathing. Touching parts of certain plants, especially the sap, may cause various skin irritations. The weight and age of the human or pet involved, and the part and amount of plant eaten determine how severe the reaction to the toxins will be. Although plants may be listed as non-toxic, they can still cause individual allergic reactions. If there is any question after a houseplant has been ingested or touched immediately call the Poison Control Center 1-800-222-1222 The Handbook of Poisonous and Injurious Plants [Paperback]is an excellent reference to keep around if you have young children and pets. in Don’t Feed Me To Your Cat! A Guide to Poisonous Houseplants

Order a Sago Palm http://amzn.to/2jt9QJS



 

Plant id: Shamrock Plant

Hi,

Your plant is called a Shamrock Plant. Other names for it are Oxalis regnelli or Clover Plant.

Shamrock Plants usually  appear in flower shops around St. Patrick’s Day. These plants have the nickname Shamrock Plant because of their soft, thin, triangular leaves that are divided into three leaflets just like a lucky clover plant. ”Oxalis regnelli, the green leafed version of the Shamrock Plant, has small delicate white flowers while Oxalis triangularis, or False Shamrock Plant, has dark purple leaves and pinkish lavender flowers. Shamrock Plants are bulb plants and usually die back a little after they bloom. Don’t throw them out, they just need a little rest before starting to grow again. Read all my care tips on how to grow Shamrock Plants in the Popular Houseplant section of the website. https://www.houseplant411.com/houseplant/shamrock-plant-how-to-grow-care

Green Sharock Plant with White flowers

Shamrock Plant

These plants are considered slightly poisonous if eaten in large quantities and should be kept away from pets and children. Read more about common houseplants that are poisonous in Don’t Feed Me To Your Cat! A Guide to Poisonous Houseplants

Order your Shamrock Plants from Amazon http://amzn.to/2jGeQtP 





 

Please help identify my dying houseplant!!

Hi Lauren,

Your plant is a Schefflera also called an Umbrella tree. My best advice is to cut the entire plant back to about 4″-5″ above the soil line. Re-pot into a container with drip holes in the bottom and that is only a few inches larger that the root ball. Use new, fresh, good potting soil.  Follow these tips on how to grow a Schefflera Umbrella tree and hopefully it will grow into a beautiful plant.